OCTOBER 9
NEW TECHNOLOGIES TO
OPTIMIZE OUR PRODUCTION PROCESSES

     
   

OCTOBER 9
COMMITMENT TO PRODUCTION AND EXPORT QUALITY

     
   

JANUARY 21
THE FIRST DIFFERENTIAL

     
   

JANUARY 21
THE CRITICAL MASS

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  OCTOBER 9      
       
 

NEW TECHNOLOGIES TO OPTIMIZE OUR PRODUCTION

PROCESSES

Tifec owns an industrial plant with a covered surface of 7,000 square meters located in Córdoba, Argentina. Tifec is equipped with state-of-the-art machinery and production in terms of design of parts, final packaging and delivery.

Throughout the years, we have been incorporating new technologies with the purpose of optimizing our production processes. In June 2007, we incorporated the Gleason Revacycle 724 straight bevel gear shaper. This machine, which has an excellent quality and high production rates, reduces costs and makes us more competitive.

Likewise, in November 2006, we incorporated a state-of-the-art Mitsubishi GE20A CNC gear hobber which has given us the chance to operate with important national and international factories.

Also, in October 2010, we incorporated another Mitsubishi GE20A CNC gear hobber to the production machinery which has fostered brand expansion.

In addition, in February 2012 we incorporated the KAO MING KMC-1100V CNC Vertical Machining Center, which enabled us to integrate many processes we used to outsource; thus, we increased competitiveness and, in particular, production flexibility and reaction capacity.

Finally, in July 2012, we incorporated a CARL ZEISS CONTURA G2 Coordinate Measuring Machine to the production equipment, with software to measure and cut gears, which are a distinctive feature and an advantage over other similar machines. This provides, in a few minutes, a thorough control of any gear and provides a report similar to one given by a Klingelnberg CNC gear cutting machine.

The ongoing improvement of our production processes and the incorporation of new technologies make a difference for our company, which seeks production excellence for the full satisfaction of our customers.

 

 

 
 
Click on image so see our PHOTO GALLERY
 
    »BACK TO TOP      
           
  OCTOBER 9      
 

COMMITMENT TO PRODUCTION AND EXPORT QUALITY

At TIFEC, we prioritize customer satisfaction through our commitment to high quality products and we are in line with technological advances.


Since 1998, when we made the first sale to AGCO Brazil, we have focused our efforts on increasing our presence in international markets, in particular on products for the Brazilian agricultural sector, gaining a great deal of acceptance that continues to date.


In August 2000, the brand obtained the first ISO 9002/94 Quality Certification, using state-of-the-art technology, ongoing training for human resources, high safety standards, and full awareness in terms of environmental care in every production process.


Likewise, in October 2009, we incorporated two big terminals to our customer portfolio: ARVIN MERITOR and AGRITECH; both companies are still our customers.

 

In July 2010, we updated the ISO 9001:2008 Quality Certification Standard, which contributed to the recognition of our products, the constant improvement of the production processes, the validation of the process designs and the high level of customer satisfaction.

 

 

 
 
 
 
    »BACK TO TOP      
           
  JANUARY 21      
 

THE FIRST DIFFERENTIAL

The differential and the Antikythera mechanism are closely related. Even considering the technical knowledge in those times (Antikythera mechanism was found at the bottom of the Aegean sea in the early 20th century, but it is supposed to be an invention of the 1st century B.C., i.e., around 2000 years ago), it appears as the tip of the iceberg. It is said that this mechanism is the prototype that was left after very updated technology for those days, which, for unknown reasons, was aborted. Although the clockwork mechanisms used were already known by the Alexandrines (from Alexandria), the device has a particular and vital part, the differential, which would be reinvented many centuries later.

When and where the differential was invented is still subject to discussions. The French say that it was invented by a clockmaker named Pécqueur, in 1828; while the English say it was made by one of them, someone called Wiillis, in 1841 and improved by Starley later in 1877.

What is a differential? It is a mechanism that allows each of the driving wheels to rotate at different speeds mainly when turning corners. It is found in cars, railways and in helicopter rotors as well. Thanks to the differential, the drive shaft moves the half shafts through gears, which are oddly still called planetary and satellite gearing.

And what was the Antikythera instrument for? The hypothesis that says that the device was a planetarium has been gaining followers. It is said that the sunrise, the moon phases, the orbit of the five planets already known, equinoxes, several astronomic cycles, the months and days could be calculated. Recent research evidenced traces of the inscriptions Nemea” and “Olympia”, "which means that it was also used to fix the date for the Nemean Games and the Olympia Panhellenic.

What was that device like? It was made inside a shoe-box-sized shell and had a frontal and two lateral dials which were supposed to have hands that indicated different numbers. Inside, there was a clockwork mechanism made up of thirty gears with triangular teeth which were supposed to be triggered by one or two cranks.

 

 

 
 
Antikythera mechanism reconstruction
 
  Source: Página12 »BACK TO TOP      
           
  JANUARY 21      
         
 

THE CRITICAL MASS

One of the questions brought up by the Antikythera mechanism (a planetarium apparently built in the 1st century and found inside a Greco-Roman ship wreck that has sunk in the Aegean Sea) is how such an advanced technology could coexist with the poor technology Greeks and Romans had. Another question that comes up is why the Greek science, or its successor, the Romans, could not make the same leap the Industrial Revolution made in the 18th century, and why they got stuck and declined slowly but steadily.

The most common answer is that, immerse in a society where slavery was practiced, nobody would even think about using machines to save efforts. The second part of this speculation is that, apparently, there was a strong prejudice against technology among the ancient philosophers. This situation is studied by the historian Bertrand Gille: Within the Greek technical culture, those aspects make up a vicious cycle: when work is looked down on, slavery becomes necessary, and looking down on slaves makes work become worthless. This version expressed by Gille is the most systematic one.

It is true that the Greco-Roman culture was not the only one that got stuck at a certain level; it seems that the same happened with Mayans and Incas. Now then, why did English, in the 18th century start the Industrial Revolution? Because at a certain point several factors that produced a cause-and-effect chain came along; for example, mining resulted in the development of the steam engine, which led to advances in metallurgic and transport and required new mining developments; and from then on, to different fields. The Greek did not reach the critical mass, if they had, they could have undoubtedly changed the course of history.


For use with Dana's product

 

     
  Source: Página12